Grading System in NepalGrading System in Nepal

A grading system was recently introduced and incorporated into the Nepali education system. It wasn’t until 2016 AD that Grading System in Nepal was put in place for the newly released SEE. SLC (School Leaving Certificate), the leaving examination for the secondary education system (Class 10) has been brought back as SEE (Secondary Education Examination).

Before 2016 AD, only a few companies used the grading system. The concept of grading system became popular when HSEB (Higher Secondary Examination Board) implemented letter grades alongside GPA. Although a few years have passed since its inception, many people do not understand the grading system. The confusion may be due to the sudden introduction of a booking system in an environment where many people use climbing.

Also check,

Today, logos are used in many places, both in schools and at the university level. The number of companies using percentage estimation seems to be small. Many schools and universities have developed their own guidelines and procedures for their own courses, but the government has decided on a standard system for Nepal, the Education Act of 2016.

Where the NEB and other school boards conduct examinations, the marks obtained by the candidate will not be displayed, only in the internal examination of the school or college, the numerical marks and their results will be displayed. NEB introduced the current scoring system for SEE, Grade 11 and Grade 12. This blog will discuss the definitions, limitations, and changes in the note system.

What is Letter grading system in nepal?

The Letter Grading System is an educational assessment method used to evaluate and communicate a student’s performance in a course or academic setting. It involves assigning letter grades to represent the quality of a student’s work and their overall understanding of the material covered in the course.

Each letter grade corresponds to a specific range of achievement, providing a standardized way to convey a student’s performance to educators, students, parents, and other stakeholders.

Here’s a breakdown of the traditional Letter Grading System commonly used in many educational institutions:

1.A (Excellent): This grade is typically awarded to students who have demonstrated a thorough understanding of the subject matter and consistently excelled in their assignments, exams, and participation.

2.B (Good): Students who earn a B grade have generally performed well and displayed a good grasp of the material, even though their performance might not be consistently outstanding.

3.C (Satisfactory): A C grade indicates that the student has met the minimum requirements for passing the course and has demonstrated a satisfactory level of understanding. While it’s not exceptional, it still represents a competent performance.

4.D (Poor/Failing): A D grade suggests that the student’s performance has fallen below satisfactory levels. While they might have passed the course, their understanding of the material is limited.

5.F (Fail): An F grade signifies that the student’s performance has been insufficient and does not meet the requirements to pass the course. In most cases, students who receive an F grade will need to retake the course to earn credit.

In addition to these standard letter grades, some institutions might use “+” and “-” modifiers: For example, an A+ would indicate an exceptional performance beyond an ordinary A, while an A- might represent a slightly lower level of excellence.

It’s worth noting that the Letter Grading System can vary in terms of the exact ranges assigned to each grade, depending on the educational institution and sometimes even the specific course. Additionally, some institutions might use alternative grading systems, such as Pass/Fail or competency-based grading, to better align with their educational philosophies.

In recent years, there has been a growing conversation about the limitations and potential drawbacks of the Letter Grading System, including concerns about its ability to accurately represent a student’s true understanding of the material and its potential to create unnecessary competition among students. Some educators and institutions are exploring more holistic and flexible assessment methods to provide a more comprehensive evaluation of student learning.

What is GPA?

GPA stands for Grade Point Average. It’s a standard way of measuring a student’s academic performance in schools and colleges. The GPA is calculated on a numerical scale, usually ranging from 0.0 to 4.0 or 5.0, depending on the grading system used by the institution.

Here’s a breakdown of how GPA works:

  1. Grades: In most educational systems, students receive grades for their courses, usually in the form of letters (A, B, C, etc.) or percentages. These grades represent the student’s performance in a particular course.
  2. Grade Points: Each grade is assigned a corresponding grade point. For example, in a typical 4.0 GPA scale:
  • A might be worth 4.0 grade points
  • B might be worth 3.0 grade points
  • C might be worth 2.0 grade points
  • D might be worth 1.0 grade point
  • F (fail) might be worth 0.0 grade points

1.Credit Hours: Courses are often assigned credit hours based on their duration and complexity. A standard course might be worth 3 or 4 credit hours, for example.

2.Calculating GPA: To calculate GPA, you multiply the grade points earned in a course by the credit hours for that course. Add up these values for all courses and then divide by the total credit hours taken. The result is your GPA. Example:

  • Course 1: A (4.0) × 3 credit hours = 12.0 grade points
  • Course 2: B (3.0) × 4 credit hours = 12.0 grade points
  • Course 3: C (2.0) × 3 credit hours = 6.0 grade points
  • Total grade points: 12.0 + 12.0 + 6.0 = 30.0
  • Total credit hours: 3 + 4 + 3 = 10
  • GPA = Total grade points / Total credit hours = 30.0 / 10 = 3.0

GPA is often used to assess a student’s academic performance over a semester, academic year, or the entire duration of their education. It’s used by educational institutions for admissions, scholarships, and to gauge a student’s eligibility for various programs. A higher GPA generally indicates better academic performance, and it’s an important factor in many educational and career opportunities.

Remember, GPA calculation methods can vary slightly between institutions and countries, so it’s important to understand the specific grading scale and calculation used by your school or college.

What is CGPA?


CGPA, or Cumulative Grade Point Average, is a numerical measure used by schools and colleges to gauge a student’s overall academic performance. It’s an average of grade points earned in different courses.

Calculating CGPA:

  1. Assign grade points to grades (A=4, B=3, C=2, etc.).
  2. Multiply each grade point by the course’s credit hours.
  3. Add up all weighted grade points.
  4. Sum up total credit hours.
  5. Divide weighted grade points by total credit hours for CGPA.

Why CGPA Matters:

  1. Academic Picture: CGPA shows how well you’ve done across courses and semesters.
  2. Scholarships and Awards: High CGPA can lead to financial support and recognition.
  3. Job Prospects: Employers value strong CGPA as a sign of dedication and skills.
  4. Further Studies: Many postgrad programs consider CGPA for admissions.
  5. Personal Growth: Maintaining CGPA encourages discipline and time management.

How do I Convert my Percentage from GPA?

One cannot convert their percentage to their GPA score. GPA is the average given for the overall marks accumulated in the test, not the total marks but only the average of the total marks obtained by the students while the percentage required for the actual marks. The percentage required is 100% multiplied by the student’s total grade point average. As GPA does not provide the criteria required for percentile calculation, it is not possible to estimate the percentile a student has earned from their GPA score.

GPA = (Percentage / Total Possible Percentage) * GPA Scale

Here’s how to use the formula:

  1. Percentage: Input your percentage score. For example, if you have a percentage score of 85%, use 85 in the formula.
  2. Total Possible Percentage: Determine the maximum percentage possible in your grading system. For example, if the maximum possible percentage is 100%, use 100 in the formula.
  3. GPA Scale: Identify the GPA scale used by your institution. For example, if your GPA is on a 4.0 scale, use 4 in the formula.

Example: Let’s say you have a percentage score of 85% and your institution uses a 4.0 GPA scale.

GPA = (85 / 100) * 4 GPA = 0.85 * 4 GPA = 3.4

So, in this example, your GPA would be 3.4 on a 4.0 scale.

Remember, this formula is a general guideline, and the specific conversion method might vary based on your institution’s policies. Always refer to your institution’s guidelines for accurate GPA conversion.

What are the changes in the New Grading System?

The government has made some changes in the scoring system in Nepal. Created from the year 2078, notes that were only applied to grades 10-11, will be applied to grades 1-12 with the following instructions:

GradeLetter GradeGrade PointsDescription
A+4.090-100Excellent, Outstanding Performance
A3.7 – 3.985-89Very Good, High Achievement
A-3.3 – 3.680-84Good, Above Average
B+3.0 – 3.275-79Above Average, Satisfactory
B2.7 – 2.970-74Satisfactory, Acceptable Performance
B-2.3 – 2.665-69Acceptable, Adequate
C+2.0 – 2.260-64Adequate, Fair
C1.7 – 1.955-59Fair, Minimum Passing
C-1.3 – 1.650-54Below Average, Minimal Passing
D+1.0 – 1.245-49Marginal, Needs Improvement
D0.7 – 0.940-44Needs Improvement, Poor
F0.00-39Fail, Unsatisfactory

Description of Each Grade

GradePerformanceDescription
A+OutstandingThe student has vast and profound knowledge with advanced critical insight along with an extensive and insightful appreciation of the theoretical or practical subject matter. They also have a remarkable ability to use, organize, analyze and concisely present the subject clearly and fluently with a remarkable performance; a notable ability for creative, original, and rational views with exceptional communication skills.
AExcellentThe student has vast and profound knowledge with refined critical insight along with an extensive and insightful appreciation of the theoretical or practical subject matter. They also have a remarkable ability to use, organize, analyze and concisely present the subject clearly and fluently with a commendable performance; a notable ability for creative, original, and rational views with progressive communication skills.
B+Very GoodThe student has vast knowledge with refined insight along with an extensive and individual appreciation of the theoretical or practical subject matter. They also have a distinct ability to use, organize, analyze and concisely present the subject clearly with effective performance; a commendable ability for creative, original, and rational views with proper communication skills.
BGoodThe student has acceptable knowledge with refined insight along with an extensive and decent appreciation of the theoretical or practical subject matter. They also have the ability to use, organize, analyze and concisely present the subject clearly with decent performance; the ability for creative, original, and rational views with acceptable communication skills.
C+SatisfactoryThe student has satisfactory knowledge with refining insight along with a comprehensive and comparatively decent appreciation of the theoretical or practical subject matter. They also have the ability to use, organize, analyze and concisely present the subject clearly with faultless performance; an acceptable ability for creative, original, and rational views with adequate communication skills.
CAcceptableThe student has satisfactory knowledge with refining insight along with an inclusive and incomplete understanding of the theoretical or practical subject matter. They also have a confined ability to use, organize, analyze and concisely present the subject clearly with guiltless performance; a confined ability for creative, original, and rational views with basic communication skills.
DBasicThe student has slight knowledge with refining insight along with an inclusive and sufficient understanding of the theoretical or practical subject matter. They also have the ability to use, organize, analyze and concisely present the subject clearly with guiltless performance; a minimum ability for creative, original, and rational views with tolerable communication skills.
NGNot GradedThe student has little knowledge with inadequate insight along with a broad and trivial understanding of the theoretical or practical subject matter. They also have a concerningly faulty ability to use, organize, analyze and concisely present the subject; a very confined ability for creative, original, and rational views with incompetent communication skills.

Please note that the provided descriptions are based on the information you provided and might not correspond to any specific grading system used in an educational institution.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q1: What is the new grading system?

Ans: The new grading system is an updated method of evaluating and assessing student performance. It could involve changes in grade scales, grade point calculations, or even the introduction of new letter grades to better reflect student achievement.

Q2: Why is there a new grading system?

Ans: The introduction of a new grading system might be driven by the need to align with evolving educational standards, provide a more accurate representation of student performance, or simplify the assessment process.

Q3: How does the new grading system work?

Ans: The new grading system could involve changes in grade scales, where the range of percentages associated with each letter grade is adjusted. It might also modify how GPA is calculated or introduce additional grades to better differentiate between levels of achievement.

Q4: Will my old grades be affected by the new system?

Ans: Generally, existing grades might not be retroactively changed when a new grading system is introduced. However, institutions could provide conversion tables or guidelines to help students and institutions understand how old grades correspond to the new system.

Q5: What are the benefits of the new grading system?

Ans: The benefits could include a more accurate representation of student performance, improved alignment with educational standards, reduced ambiguity in assessing achievement, and better differentiation between different levels of proficiency.

Q6: Will the new grading system affect my GPA?

Ans: Yes, if the new grading system changes the grade point values associated with each letter grade or the percentage ranges for those grades, your GPA calculation might be affected. You may need to use a different formula to calculate your GPA based on the new system.

Q7: How can I understand the new grading system?

Ans: Your educational institution should provide clear guidelines explaining the changes in the grading system. This could include updated grade scales, conversion tables, and explanations of how the new system works.

Q8: Will the new grading system impact my scholarship or admission chances?

Ans: It’s possible that scholarship committees or admissions offices may adjust their evaluation criteria to account for the new grading system. Make sure to check with the relevant authorities to understand how the new system could affect your opportunities.

Q9: What should I do to adapt to the new grading system?

Ans: Familiarize yourself with the new grade scales, GPA calculation methods, and any additional grading criteria introduced. If needed, seek guidance from your teachers, advisors, or institution’s academic office to ensure a smooth transition.

Q10: How do I calculate my GPA in the new grading system?

Ans: To calculate your GPA in the new system, use the formula provided by your institution. This formula might involve adjusting the grade point values based on the new grade scales and then calculating the GPA as usual.

%d bloggers like this: